Haringey Community Press

Haringey Community Press

Haringey criticised by Healthy Streets coalition

The borough ranked 12th on the annual 2022 Healthy Streets Scorecard

Hero for Haringey criticised by Healthy Streets coalition
A 'School Street' in Enfield. Credit: Enfield Council
By Alice Kemp-Habib 06 July 2022

Haringey has been criticised for taking “too long” to implement plans that would improve safety, accessibility and air quality on the borough’s roads. Haringey has been criticised for taking “too long” to implement plans that would improve safety, accessibility and air quality on the borough’s roads. 

The borough ranked 12th on the annual 2022 Healthy Streets Scorecard, which takes Low Traffic Neighbourhoods (LTNs), School Streets and 20mph speed limits into account, among other things.  The borough ranked 12th on the annual 2022 Healthy Streets Scorecard, which takes Low Traffic Neighbourhoods (LTNs), School Streets and 20mph speed limits into account, among other things.  

The report comes from the Healthy Streets coalition, which brings together a range of London-based transport, health, road safety and environmental campaigns. The report comes from the Healthy Streets coalition, which brings together a range of London-based transport, health, road safety and environmental campaigns. 

Haringey was praised for upping the proportion of schools with a traffic-free ‘School Street’ to 27% (from 12% in 2021). The borough also had a high score for ‘School STARS’, a TfL-accredited scheme which encourages young people to travel to school sustainably. Haringey was praised for upping the proportion of schools with a traffic-free ‘School Street’ to 27% (from 12% in 2021). The borough also had a high score for ‘School STARS’, a TfL-accredited scheme which encourages young people to travel to school sustainably. 

However, the report highlights a lack of cycle track in the borough, saying that what exists is generally not joined up and of poor quality. However, the report highlights a lack of cycle track in the borough, saying that what exists is generally not joined up and of poor quality. 

The coalition also states that plans around proposed LTNs are taking too long. According to the findings, only 17% of streets in the borough are in a Low Traffic Neighbourhood (and most of these are historic LTNs), compared to 49% in Waltham Forest and 70% in Hackney. The coalition also states that plans around proposed LTNs are taking too long. According to the findings, only 17% of streets in the borough are in a Low Traffic Neighbourhood (and most of these are historic LTNs), compared to 49% in Waltham Forest and 70% in Hackney. 

In December 2021, after more than a year of engagement, Haringey Council agreed to introduce LTNs in the Bounds Green, Bruce Grove West Green and St Ann’s areas of the borough. Consultations are ongoing. In December 2021, after more than a year of engagement, Haringey Council agreed to introduce LTNs in the Bounds Green, Bruce Grove West Green and St Ann’s areas of the borough. Consultations are ongoing.

The coalition emphasised that Haringey only retained its standings because it had already implemented widespread 20mph speed limits and controlled parking across the borough (though controlled parking only covers 67% of streets, a much lower rate than other Inner London boroughs.)The coalition emphasised that Haringey only retained its standings because it had already implemented widespread 20mph speed limits and controlled parking across the borough (though controlled parking only covers 67% of streets, a much lower rate than other Inner London boroughs.)

Ben House, co-ordinator Haringey Cycling Campaign, said: "The pace of change in Haringey remains too slow, so we are hopeful that 2022-2023 will be a time for rapid and positive initiatives - more ‘School Streets’ and safe routes to school for children, alongside action on much-needed LTN schemes and the introduction of safe, protected cycle tracks. We are ready to support Mike Hakata in implementing measures to make active travel one of Haringey's priorities this electoral term."Ben House, co-ordinator Haringey Cycling Campaign, said: "The pace of change in Haringey remains too slow, so we are hopeful that 2022-2023 will be a time for rapid and positive initiatives - more ‘School Streets’ and safe routes to school for children, alongside action on much-needed LTN schemes and the introduction of safe, protected cycle tracks. We are ready to support Mike Hakata in implementing measures to make active travel one of Haringey's priorities this electoral term."

Mike Hakata, the council’s deputy leader and cabinet member for climate action, environment and transport, said: “Our Administration is on a mission to make this a walking, cycling and wheeling  borough. Mike Hakata, the council’s deputy leader and cabinet member for climate action, environment and transport, said: “Our Administration is on a mission to make this a walking, cycling and wheeling  borough. 

 “As part of our Haringey 'Streets for People' initiative, we have already implemented 23 school streets and were the fastest growing borough in this regard this last year, with many more to follow, and are introducing three low traffic neighbourhoods in 2022 following an extensive engagement exercise.  “As part of our Haringey 'Streets for People' initiative, we have already implemented 23 school streets and were the fastest growing borough in this regard this last year, with many more to follow, and are introducing three low traffic neighbourhoods in 2022 following an extensive engagement exercise. 

 “Engagement work will begin later this month on two further schemes. We are creating a network of inclusive strategic cycling routes, several have recently been made permanent and we have begun feasibility work on a number of new routes.  “Engagement work will begin later this month on two further schemes. We are creating a network of inclusive strategic cycling routes, several have recently been made permanent and we have begun feasibility work on a number of new routes. 

 “We are exploring the design of inviting walking routes between shops, schools, leisure destinations and green spaces. All these initiatives, which are set out in our adopted Walking and Cycling Action Plan, will play a critical role in supporting a green recovery from the pandemic and achieving our ambition of tackling the climate emergency and becoming a net-zero borough by 2041.” “We are exploring the design of inviting walking routes between shops, schools, leisure destinations and green spaces. All these initiatives, which are set out in our adopted Walking and Cycling Action Plan, will play a critical role in supporting a green recovery from the pandemic and achieving our ambition of tackling the climate emergency and becoming a net-zero borough by 2041.”