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Council agrees to buy new-build Tottenham homes on hospital site

Up to 154 homes will be bought from the 995-home scheme being built at St Ann’s Hospital, reports Grace Howarth, Local Democracy Reporter

Plans for St Ann's Hospital and (inset) cabinet member Ruth Gordon
Plans for St Ann’s Hospital and (inset) cabinet member Ruth Gordon

Haringey Council has decided to purchase up to 154 homes from a development site in Tottenham for use as sheltered accommodation.

Housing association Peabody is set to build 995 homes on the site of disused buildings at St Ann’s Hospital in St Ann’s Road.

The council proposed acquiring 38 homes from part of the first phase of the development, which will be used as sheltered accommodation specifically for elderly residents on the council’s housing waiting list. 

The second proposal was to purchase “up to 116 additional homes” from the subsequent phases of development.

Ruth Gordon, cabinet member for council housing, presented the proposals during a cabinet meeting on Tuesday (6th) and said the purchases would form part of the council’s pledge to build 3,000 council homes by 2031. 

Cllr Gordon clarified the 38 homes would be “smaller homes” including “one-beds with a couple of two-beds”. She said homes they were looking at in later phases would be “larger family sized homes” including “41 three-bedrooms, 14 four-bedrooms and 34 two-bedroom properties”. 

Mike Hakata, council deputy leader and a ward councillor for Hermitage and Gardens where the development is located, asked whether residents living in overcrowded accommodation in the ward would be given “first option”.  He also asked to confirm the timescale of delivery.

Cllr Gordon reiterated the first phase was for sheltered accommodation for elderly residents on waiting lists while the rest would be “general needs”.

Jack Goulde, interim head of housing development, confirmed the first 38 homes were due for completion “mid-2026” and work was currently “ongoing”. 

Cllr Gordon added these homes came under the neighbourhood moves scheme, which means existing council tenants have priority for new council homes being built near them. 

Those given first priority are tenants whose homes are being demolished and need moving to new homes. Afterwards, priority is given to tenants who live on the same estate as new homes or within 250 metres of the new homes. 

Cllr Hakata asked whether the households at Tiverton Estate, where there is a lot of overcrowding, qualified. Part of the hospital site is close to the estate and could potentially fall within 250m, however Cllr Hakata asked to confirm how measurement was taken. 

Cllr Gordon said building was taking place on Tiverton Estate to “relieve some of the overcrowding as well”.

She referred to the “Remington scheme” which was “almost ready for occupation”. This comprises 46 council rent homes due to be delivered on a site formerly occupied by garages next to Remington Road and Pulford Road.

Jack said the 250m applied at “any point on the estate”. He explained: “If any part of those surrounding estates are within the 250m [of the development] then the whole of the estate is within the neighbourhood move scheme.”